The AIA 2030 Commitment: Go There

Money, religion, sex … and politics. In many social settings, these are still taboo topics. Politics is especially radioactive these days. You just can’t go there.

So let’s “go there”. Let’s talk politics.

Suppose you’re an architect or designer with a firm that has signed the AIA 2030 Commitment, and your firm reports the designed energy use of all your projects every year. You’re probably working to reduce the Energy Use Intensity or Lighting Power Density of your projects. That’s excellent. Good for you, good for your firm.

If this is so, you’ve probably found yourself in a conference room talking about the AIA 2030 Commitment’s online reporting site, the Design Data Exchange (aka the “DDx”). You may even have discussed Energy Star Target Finder, since that’s the program that sets building energy targets within the DDx. If you’re a serious building energy geek, you may have heard about EnergyPlus or OpenStudio, a couple open-source programs that support building energy modeling calculations. Good stuff.

What you probably haven’t talked about in that conference room: politics. You know the rules. No politics in business-related settings.

This isn’t a bad idea. We architect/designer types are inclusive and tolerant. Our work involves big teams of people like builders and engineers and public officials and clients with money. We have to work with everyone, right?

But hear me out. That AIA 2030 Commitment DDx? It was developed by the American Institute of Architects in partnership with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A lot of the work on the DDx was done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Energy Star is an EPA program, and EnergyPlus and OpenStudio are both DOE programs developed at the LBNL.

Both the EPA and DOE could see their budgets slashed by Congress in 2018. Drastic cuts are also being considered for NASA’s earth-science research, NOAA’s weather satellite budget, and the kind of software development the LBNL does. This is stuff we use every day.

So, really, there’s nothing “taboo” about any of this. In order to drive greater building energy use efficiency through our design work, Architects depend on programs and technologies developed by agencies within the United States federal government. And we need to see funding for these agencies protected.

That’s why the AIA Committee on the Environment (COTE) does advocacy work. Teaming with the AIA’s Government Relations and Advocacy staff, AIA COTE has its own web page that keeps folks informed about urgent issues and what you can do to help. Scroll down the page and find a spreadsheet of all the EPA and DOE programs that are critical to our work. Read the letters of support for these EPA and DOE programs signed by almost 800 firms, and check out the “101” on the federal budgeting process. And make your presence known by joining the AIA COTE Advocacy Network.

Don’t think of advocacy as “politics”. Think of it as responsible citizenship. We should absolutely go there.

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One Comment on “The AIA 2030 Commitment: Go There”

  1. Katie says:

    Very nice. You are a genius! ❤️💋

    Sent from my iPhone

    >


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